Cube Optics introduces 8-channel CWDM with flexible fiber connections

March 25, 2003--Cube Optics AG, German developer and manufacturer of miniaturized fiber-optic components, introduced today what it claims is the smallest 8-channel Coarse WDM (CWDM) available. The company's Flexible Fiber Connection (FFC) enables the customer to decide on the location of the fiber ports, resulting in efficient use of space and design flexibility.

March 25, 2003--Cube Optics AG, German developer and manufacturer of miniaturized fiber-optic components, introduced today what it claims is the smallest 8-channel Coarse WDM (CWDM) available. The company's Flexible Fiber Connection (FFC) enables the customer to decide on the location of the fiber ports, resulting in efficient use of space and design flexibility. The 8-channel CWDM is available for delivery April 1, 2003.

The new modules are up to 100 times smaller than standard devices, claim company representatives, and are designed to meet the tough space constraints demanded by metro and access systems. The dimensions of the modules are 19 x 15.5 x 8.5 mm³.

"Our customers need compact solutions since CWDM communication systems are often installed where space is very limited and expensive," explains CUBO's chief executive officer Thomas Paatzsch. "The extremely small size of our CWDM Color-Cubes allows metro and access system designers to shrink their systems."

The new 8-channel CWDM Color-Cube complements CUBO'S CWDM product family, which includes Add-Drops, and 4-channel CWDMs. It also provides additional functions such as tap ports, upgrade channels, or integrated bandsplitters. Designed to work with uncooled lasers having wavelengths spaced 20 nm apart, the modules' performance is independent of protocols and data rates. The devices also feature standard market specifications.

Cube Optics employs passive assembly for the manufacture of the tiny Color-Cubes. In this process, the alignment and positioning of the optical sub-components, such as glass fibers and filters, is carried out by precise alignment structures. In contrast to active assembly--in which the elements have to be actively adjusted by maximizing the power of a transmitted light signal--time, effort and production costs are significantly reduced, claims the company. Polymer Optical Benches (POBs) are produced in a micro-precision injection molding process based on traditional mass-production methods. These not only contain the high-precision alignment structures for passive assembly, but also make possible an extremely compact component design.

For more information about Cube Optics AG (CUBO), based in Mainz, Germany, visit the company's Web site at www.cubeoptics.com/a>.

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