OIF releases specs for MSA-100GLH 100G modules, control plane logging and auditing

JULY 15, 2010 -- The Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF) members has completed implementation agreements (IAs) covering the key electro-mechanical aspects of its MSA-100GLH 100G long-haul transmission module and control plane logging and auditing.

JULY 15, 2010 -- The Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF) members has completed implementation agreements (IAs) covering the key electro-mechanical aspects of its MSA-100GLH 100G long-haul transmission module and control plane logging and auditing.

The OIF 100G Long-Haul DWDM Transmission Module IA covers several important aspects of the MSA-100GLH:

  • module mechanical dimensions
  • electrical connector and pin assignment
  • module hardware signaling pins
  • high-speed electrical characteristics
  • power supply
  • power dissipation
  • management interface.


The MSA-100GLH is a board-mounted module that is not designed to be hot-pluggable. Two optical fiber pigtails, one for optical transmit and the other for optical receive, are terminated and attached to the host line card face plate. The maximum module size is 5x7 inches (127.0x177.8 mm ).

“We expect this to be the industry successor for the 300-pin MSA,” said Karl Gass, the OIF’s Physical and Link Layer Working Group vice chair. “This design provides for higher density placement on host line cards with a higher-speed data and advanced management interface.”

A copy of the MSA-100GLH IA is available on the OIF website.

The OIF Control Plane Logging and Auditing with Syslog IA defines the protocols, record types, data structures, and fields for log files generated by a network element (NE). It also addresses controlling and securing the generation, transport, and storage of log data to provide a flexible logging capability for the OIF’s User Network Interface (UNI) and External Network to Network Interface (E-NNI).

Version 1.1 of the IA fully conforms to the IETF standards for Syslog and defines a general set of log messages for the OIF's control plane protocols.

“The ability to log signaling and routing messages as they traverse multiple UNI or E-NNI interfaces adds a useful and effective way to help assure correct and secure operation of the signaling and routing entities,” said Doug Zuckerman, of Telcordia Technologies and the OIF’s OAM&P Working Group chair. “This is an important tool to help carriers deploy and operate control plane technology in their networks.”

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