CyOptics demonstrates 80-Gbit/sec transmission

January 25, 2006 Lehigh Valley, PA -- CyOptics announced that it has successfully demonstrated 80-Gbit/sec data transmission for supercomputing and short-range (2 km) datacom and telecom markets. The company says that through its photonic integration capabilities and automated packaging platform, the TOSA/ROSA engines in the demonstration achieved symmetrical 80 Gbit/sec transmission with a confirmed error free transmission to 1E-15.

Jan 25th, 2006

January 25, 2006 Lehigh Valley, PA -- CyOptics, a provider of high performance Indium Phosphide (InP)-based lasers and detector products for broadband communications platforms, announced that it has successfully demonstrated 80-Gbit/sec data transmission for supercomputing and short-range (2 km) datacom and telecom markets.

The company says that through its photonic integration capabilities and automated packaging platform, the transmit optical subassembly (TOSA) and receive optical subassembly (ROSA) engines in the demonstration transmit and receive at 80 Gbit/sec in each direction with a confirmed error free transmission to 1E-15. The engines were also successfully tested over a 2 km fiber path in loop-back mode.

"This technology advancement is a major step forward in leveraging InP optical integration to lower data transmission costs," remarks Dr. Uzi Koren, chief technical officer of CyOptics.

According to a press release, the 80-Gbit/sec CyOptics product was designed and developed in partnership with Cray Inc., and is tied to the U.S. government's High Productivity Computing Systems (HPCS) program. According to CyOptics, the product's design has the flexibility to accommodate 4x or greater bit rates, achieve a package density in excess of 10 Gbs/cm. (cubed), with a cost of only a few dollars per Gbit/sec.

"CyOptics' demonstration signals a coming shift in high performance computer interconnects from copper to optical fiber," concludes Steve Scott, chief technical officer of Cray. "The cost, performance, and signaling distance of this product will enable versatile and powerful computers."

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