ADC enters FTTP market

22 January 2004 Minneapolis, MN Lightwave -- ADC has entered the fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) market with a range of new products, including fiber distribution terminals, passive optical splitter modules, and WDM modules.

22 January 2004 Minneapolis, MN Lightwave -- ADC has entered the fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) market with a range of new products, including fiber distribution terminals, passive optical splitter modules, and WDM modules.

"The response to our new FTTP equipment has been very positive," reports Tom Kampf, director of fiber solutions for ADC's Connectivity Business Unit. "Some companies are changing their architecture in order to use our products, which ultimately saves them money. ADC has years of experience designing and building equipment for the central office and outside plant. The new equipment enables carriers to reduce network costs and increase revenues right now with new broadband services," he adds.

ADC's new FTTP products include:

Fiber Distribution Terminals: Pole- or slab-mount cabinets that feature a pre-terminated architecture with ample connector access and slack storage, splice trays, splitter modules, and bend-radius protection for all fibers managed in the cabinet. The cabinets are offered in various sizes accommodating 32 to 1,152 homes per cabinet and are designed to meet Telcordia specifications.

Passive Optical Splitter Modules: Designed for the outside plant or central office (CO), these modules give carriers the ability to split optical signals to multiple homes or businesses. Installed in the Fiber Distribution Terminal cabinet, the modules enable quick and efficient routing and splitting of individual fibers.

WDM Modules: These modules are primarily used in CO fiber panels and frames, enabling carriers to multiplex and demultiplex optical signals to combine video with voice and data. Modules are available in adaptor port or pigtailed versions.

ADC and Sumitomo Electric formed an alliance in 2003 to develop and engineer FTTP connectivity equipment for use within major telecommunications service provider networks. "Our relationship with Sumitomo Electric has benefited both companies," notes Kampf. "The ideas and expertise we've shared in the development of these products enables us to bring an offering to our customers that other companies will find hard to match."

It is estimated that $1.5 billion to 3.5 billion will be spent annually by service providers during the next five years as FTTP networks are deployed in the United States. New FTTP projects initiated by carriers and municipalities have increased by more than 87% since 2000, and states like California and Washington lead the country with more than 90,000 homes accessible to new fiber networks.

More in FTTH/B