Genesis Technical Systems trials DSL Rings G.fast competitor with Cincinnati Bell

Genesis Technical Systems says it has completed trials of its copper-based DSL Rings technology with Cincinnati Bell, Inc. The technology, which like G.fast promises to boost the capacity of copper infrastructure beyond VDSL2 levels, demonstrated an aggregate 1 Gbps in backhaul applications and an aggregate 400 Mbps in residential applications during the trial, the company says.

Genesis Technical Systems says it has completed trials of its copper-based DSL Rings technology with Cincinnati Bell, Inc. The technology, which like G.fast promises to boost the capacity of copper infrastructure beyond VDSL2 levels, demonstrated an aggregate 1 Gbps in backhaul applications and an aggregate 400 Mbps in residential applications during the trial, the company says.

The DSL Ring network building blocks include a Convergence Node (CN), a Home Gateway (HGW) in each house, and Exchange Gateway Software that monitors the rings when installed at the local exchange.

The residential trial configuration included 12 HGWs. These local access routes were connected with standard copper cables. Network reach between the CN and the HGWs was initially from 160 to 500 ft. In the backhaul test, backhaul bandwidths were measured across a maximum of 12 pairs from the DSLAM to the CN, at distances ranging from 1,000 to 3,000 ft, at 500-ft increments.

The aggregate (upstream and downstream) bandwidths of up to 1 Gbps in the backhaul network and 400 Mbps in the residential network are similar to transmission rates reported in early G.fast trials (see, for example, "BT targets G.fast for 500 Mbps" and "BT connects first G.fast trial customers"). However, the reach demonstrated in the backhaul trial is significantly longer than that envisioned for G.fast at such speeds. The DSL Rings trial also demonstrated the ability to deliver bandwidth of up to 600 Mbps for additional services, such as small cell deployment, Genesis Technical Systems asserts.

"We serve three-states reaching across 2,400 square miles. We are extremely proud of our network and what it gives to our customers – both at work and in their homes," said Tom Simpson, CTO of Cincinnati Bell. "This trial has shown, and proven, the capability to bring more than enough bandwidth to customers served by even the most mature parts of our network. Since the FCC recently changed the definition of broadband to increase the minimum speed, these results are good news for those looking to develop their infrastructure to meet the massive increases in bandwidth demand."

Cincinnati Bell participated in the trial on behalf of the Residential Access Carrier Consortium (RACC). The newly formed group of operators from North America, Europe and Latin America aims to address the requirement for improved broadband in suburban, semi-rural, and rural areas using Genesis technology.

"The results of the trial at Cincinnati Bell demonstrate the importance of DSL Rings and the opportunities the solution provides for the members of the Residential Access Carrier Consortium," said Peter Khoury, chief executive and general counsel at Genesis Technical Systems. "DSL Rings offers RACC members, including those that are Connect America Fund II (CAF II) recipients, a means to bring affordable significant broadband enhancements to customers currently receiving a limited service over their existing networks."

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