ARCOS optical marine cable network now interconnecting the Caribbean

March 1, 2002--The ARCOS (Americas Region Caribbean Optical-Ring System), a fiber-optic cable network primarily owned by New World Network, has been completed and is now commercially available. Siemens IC Networks played a key role in the realization of ARCOS as the major supplier of equipment used in the implementation of the network.

Mar 1st, 2002

The ARCOS (Americas Region Caribbean Optical-Ring System), a fiber-optic cable network primarily owned by New World Network, has been completed and is now commercially available. Siemens IC Networks played a key role in the realization of ARCOS as the major supplier of equipment used in the implementation of the network.

The ARCOS ring links 24 landing points in 15 countries within South, Central, and North America and extends for a total length of 8,600 km around the Caribbean.

"The new communications applications supported via ARCOS contributes significantly to the economic development and future prosperity of the regions it interconnects," contends Helmut Bader, chairman of the ARCOS Procurement Implementation Group.

The countries involved in ARCOS were, until now, linked using a wide variety of transmission media such as narrowband satellite systems. This meant that the quality and availability of the communications often fell short of the requirements needed on high-speed data links, explain ARCOS representatives.

In contrast, the ARCOS network is based on DWDM technology, allowing high-speed transmission throughout the region. The initial design capacity of the ring-configured network is 15 Gbits/sec on the first fiber pair, with an option to upgrade to 80 Gbits/sec. Additionally, the cables, containing up to 12 fiber pairs, offer sufficient reserves to meet future demand for capacity growth throughout the ARCOS ring. The network design allows for flexible routing of the traffic streams between the connected end customers on a demand basis and allows expansion in excess of 1 Tbit. The use of underwater signal repeaters has been largely eliminated due to the ring structure, making ARCOS cost competitive and highly reliable.

Due to ARCOS' ring configuration (the signal is transmitted in both directions simultaneously), full redundancy can be ensured in the event of a cable break. To ensure network security, the entire system is controlled and monitored from two operation centers at separate locations, one in Miami, Florida and the other in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles.

A consortium, made up of New World Network and other leading carriers in the region, is responsible for the entire construction of ARCOS. Alongside Siemens IC Networks, the German marine cable company Norddeutsche Seekabelwerke (NSW) and TyCom contributed to the construction of ARCOS sub-sea optical network.

For more information about Siemens Information and Communication Networks (IC Networks), visit the company's Web site at www.siemens.com/networks.

New World Network is a carrier's carrier that provides advanced, high-speed bandwidth capacity to telecommunications companies and Internet Service Providers. Additional information can be found on the Web at www.nwncable.com.

The ARCOS (Americas Region Caribbean Optical-Ring System), a fiber-optic cable network primarily owned by New World Network, has been completed and is now commercially available. Siemens IC Networks played a key role in the realization of ARCOS as the major supplier of equipment used in the implementation of the network.

The ARCOS ring links 24 landing points in 15 countries within South, Central, and North America and extends for a total length of 8,600 km around the Caribbean.

"The new communications applications supported via ARCOS contributes significantly to the economic development and future prosperity of the regions it interconnects," contends Helmut Bader, chairman of the ARCOS Procurement Implementation Group.

The countries involved in ARCOS were, until now, linked using a wide variety of transmission media such as narrowband satellite systems. This meant that the quality and availability of the communications often fell short of the requirements needed on high-speed data links, explain ARCOS representatives.

In contrast, the ARCOS network is based on DWDM technology, allowing high-speed transmission throughout the region. The initial design capacity of the ring-configured network is 15 Gbits/sec on the first fiber pair, with an option to upgrade to 80 Gbits/sec. Additionally, the cables, containing up to 12 fiber pairs, offer sufficient reserves to meet future demand for capacity growth throughout the ARCOS ring. The network design allows for flexible routing of the traffic streams between the connected end customers on a demand basis and allows expansion in excess of 1 Tbit. The use of underwater signal repeaters has been largely eliminated due to the ring structure, making ARCOS cost competitive and highly reliable.

Due to ARCOS' ring configuration (the signal is transmitted in both directions simultaneously), full redundancy can be ensured in the event of a cable break. To ensure network security, the entire system is controlled and monitored from two operation centers at separate locations, one in Miami, Florida and the other in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles.

A consortium, made up of New World Network and other leading carriers in the region, is responsible for the entire construction of ARCOS. Alongside Siemens IC Networks, the German marine cable company Norddeutsche Seekabelwerke (NSW) and TyCom contributed to the construction of ARCOS sub-sea optical network.

For more information about Siemens Information and Communication Networks (IC Networks), visit the company's Web site at www.siemens.com/networks.

New World Network is a carrier's carrier that provides advanced, high-speed bandwidth capacity to telecommunications companies and Internet Service Providers. Additional information can be found on the Web at www.nwncable.com.

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