Fujitsu's FLASHWAVE 7500 Extension System enables migration to full ROADM benefits

June 15, 2004 Orlando, FL -- Fujitsu Network Communications Inc. today announced the availability of the FLASHWAVE 7500 extension system, the latest configuration of the existing core platform that lowers the cost and space required to deliver the field-proven benefits of DWDM to the edge of metro networks.

June 15, 2004 Orlando, FL -- Fujitsu Network Communications Inc. today announced the availability of the FLASHWAVE 7500 extension system, the latest configuration of the existing core platform that lowers the cost and space required to deliver the field-proven benefits of DWDM to the edge of metro networks.

"The FLASHWAVE 7500 extension system is well suited for simple point-to-point networks because its cost can be justified with as few as one or two wavelengths," explains George Chase, group president and chief operating officer of Fujitsu Network Communications. "As a stand-alone platform or extension from a larger core FLASHWAVE 7500 network, the FLASHWAVE 7500 extension system delivers the benefits of DWDM transport to the edge of large networks, as well as to small networks where the cost of a core metro DWDM system cannot be justified."

Positioned for use in small- to medium-sized cities, the new FLASHWAVE 7500 extension system can be used to build point-to-point or ring networks of up to 16 wavelengths for core applications, facilitating the delivery of wavelength services, Gigabit Ethernet transport and Storage Area Networking (SAN) within smaller markets.
For larger metropolitan applications, in instances where a core DWDM system is already deployed, the FLASHWAVE 7500 extension system can broaden DWDM transport and service options through extension routes. This configuration is ideal for a number of telecom and Multiple System Operator (MSO) applications, including Gigabit Ethernet transport for Video on Demand (VOD) or for cable modem data services extended from a primary Distribution Hub (DHUB) on the core network to a remote secondary DHUB.

The FLASHWAVE 7500 extension system uses the same Optical Line Card (OLC) shelf as the core FLASHWAVE 7500 platform, a common set of transponders and familiar operational features to minimize engineering, sparing, and administration costs. As bandwidth demand grows, carriers can easily upgrade the system to a FLASHWAVE 7500 Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexing (ROADM) system. With the in-service addition of a single shelf, the platform becomes a key component in converged core networks, supporting 40 C-band wavelengths, auto-provisioning/auto-power balancing, and a flexible optical switch core that allows any channel to be dropped at any node, explain company representatives.

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