ATX debuts GigaWave Digital Link Extender 40 at this week’s ANGA COM 2018

ATX Networks has used this week's ANGA COM 2018 conference and exhibition in Cologne, Germany to commercially debut the GigaWave Digital Link Extender 40 (DLX40), the first product in its GigaWave next-generation digital optical gateway platform. The GigaWave platform offers cable operators a protocol-agnostic technology for expanding fiber access link capacity between headends/hubs and outside plant facilities.

ATX Networks has used this week's ANGA COM 2018 conference and exhibition in Cologne, Germany to commercially debut the GigaWave Digital Link Extender 40 (DLX40), the first product in its GigaWave next-generation digital optical gateway platform. The GigaWave platform offers cable operators a protocol-agnostic technology for expanding fiber access link capacity between headends/hubs and outside plant facilities with a pay-as-you-grow approach.

ATX says its first product in the platform line, the GigaWave DLX40, supports two modules that each enable cable companies to aggregate as much as 40 wavelengths (a total of 80 wavelengths) across optical access links of up to 60 km. The module 1RU DLX gives cable operators optimum flexibility by supporting Remote PHY and Remote MACPHY Distributed Access Architectures (DAA), PON, small cell/5G, and enterprise business services as well, ATX asserts.

According to ATX, the DLX modules are paired with the Digital Link Extender Remote (DLR), an all-passive, field-hardened unit located in the outside plant. To decrease power, operational complexity, and cost, while improving reliability, the headend- or hub-located DLX combines independent subsystems into a single platform. Additionally, the DLX and DLR's built-in optical path redundancy removes the need to double the number of switch/router interfaces for high-availability services, says ATX.

The ATX GigaWave platform can support an array of DWDM optical transport systems across non-redundant links and links longer than 100 km, and several other fiber architectures. The GigaWave DLX40 also enables MSOs to use digital optics over analog, such as transporting signals over longer distances, additional wavelength support, and other deep fiber architecture advantages.

A North America MSO has chosen ATX's GigaWave DLX to play an important role in its next-generation DAA initiative. ATX has not named the MSO, but states that deployments are scheduled to begin this fall.

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