Fibertech expands footprint with five new metro networks

Embarking on its most significant expansion since its inception in 2000, Fibertech Networks says it will build new metropolitan fiber networks in Akron, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dayton, and Toledo, OH, while considerably increasing the size of its existing Columbus network.

Embarking on its most significant expansion since its inception in 2000, Fibertech Networks says it will build new metropolitan fiber-optic networks in Akron, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dayton, and Toledo, OH, while considerably increasing the size of its existing Columbus network.

“This is a major expansion for Fibertech and a critical step in our development as one of the largest and fastest growing metro fiber providers in the Eastern US,” said John K. Purcell, chairman and CEO of Fibertech. “We already have major anchor tenant agreements in place in each of these markets, accelerating our position as a leading alternative access provider in Ohio.”

To date, the company has built and owns more than 8,400 route miles of metro networks in 23 markets, and provisions its end-to-end connectivity products on that infrastructure. Fibertech says this ability is a key differentiator that gives its customers unprecedented control, scalability, and security of services.

Specifically, Fibertech has networks in Pittsburgh, PA; Indianapolis, IN; Columbus, OH ; Providence, RI; Hartford, Bridgeport, Stamford, Danbury, New London, and New Haven, CT; Springfield and Worcester, MA; Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, Binghamton, White Plains, and Albany, NY; Wilmington, DE; Montgomery County, MD; Northern and Southern NJ; and Philadelphia.

Since its inception, Fibertech has expanded its metro footprint rapidly in each of the cities it has entered. Typically, the company’s original core network in a given metro market encompasses more than 100 route miles. Today, the company’s average metro network size is well over 300 route miles.

“Our expansion into these new markets will ensure Ohio businesses with cost-effective alternatives for their critical bandwidth applications while enhancing economic development initiatives in each of the communities we’re investing in,” added Purcell.

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