WorldLink brings 100-Gbps fiber-optic network capabilities to Nepal

WorldLink has begun to add 100-Gbps capabilities to its 650-km backbone fiber-optic network in Nepal with the help of Nokia, the systems house says. The network upgrade will support WorldLink's roll out of fiber to the home (FTTH) infrastructure; the service provider says its customer currently connects 10,000 residential FTTH subscribers each month.

WorldLink has begun to add 100-Gbps capabilities to its 650-km backbone fiber-optic network in Nepal with the help of Nokia, the systems house says. The network upgrade will support WorldLink's roll out of fiber to the home (FTTH) infrastructure; the service provider says its customer currently connects 10,000 residential FTTH subscribers each month.

WorldLink is Nepal's largest fixed broadband services provider, says Nokia, with 120,000 residential broadband subscribers; it also supplies 5,000 enterprise broadband circuits. Its fiber backbone network runs from Kathmandu to Bhairahawa and Birgunj. In addition to meeting WorldLink's needs within Nepal, the fiber cable network also helps provide international connections between Nepal and other countries, including India.

"WorldLink has a commitment to Nepal to transform the communications landscape so that our people and enterprises thrive," said CTO Samit Jana. "This is our largest project to date and it will allow us to provide ultra-fast broadband services for our mobile and fixed network subscribers in cities as well as rural areas across the country."

Nokia has supplied its 1830 Photonic Service Switch (PSS) for the 100G DWDM upgrade. The optical transport systems leverage the company's Photonic Service Engine-2 with super coherent technology (PSE-2s; see "Nokia upgrades 1830 PSS packet-optical transport family with new coherent chipsets, improved multi-rate performance").

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