G.fast anti-interference recommendation G.9700 receives first-stage approval

The ITU-T Study Group 15 has granted first-stage approval to Recommendation ITU-T G.9700, which specifies methods to minimize the risk that G.fast copper-based broadband equipment will interfere with broadcast services such as FM radio. G.fast is the emerging set of specifications that promise to enable copper infrastructure to support data rates as high as 500 Mbps. The ITU believes that G.fast will be ratified in the early part of next year.

The ITU-T Study Group 15 has granted first-stage approval to Recommendation ITU-T G.9700, which specifies methods to minimize the risk that G.fast copper-based broadband FTTx equipment will interfere with broadcast services such as FM radio. G.fast is the emerging set of specifications that promise to enable copper infrastructure to support data rates as high as 500 Mbps. The ITU believes that G.fast will be ratified in the early part of next year.

As described in this month’s issue of Lightwave’s e-zine (see “Will FTTN advances delay FTTH?”), G.fast is expected to cover three distance/bandwidth scenarios:

  • 500 Mbps at 100 m (300 ft)
  • 200 Mbps at 200 m
  • 150 Mbps at 250 m.

Meanwhile, several systems vendors are attempting to reach 1 Gbps using variants of the technology within the G.fast specifications. In addition to the high speeds, G.fast distribution points will be designed to be powered from the customer’s premises. Along these lines, the ITU is coordinating G.fast standards work with the Broadband Forum’s Fiber to the Distribution Point (FTTdp) system architecture project. Meanwhile, customers should be able to install the necessary CPE themselves, according to the ITU.

“G.fast is an important standard for service providers globally,” said Tom Starr, chairman of ITU-T Study Group 15, Working Party 1, which oversees the G.fast effort. “Service providers will be able to deliver fiber-like performance more quickly and more affordably than with any other approach.”

For more information on FTTx technology and suppliers, visit the Lightwave Buyer’s Guide.




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