MEL plans mechanically locked tunable SFP optical transceiver

MEL, a startup founded in 2009, announced plans for a low-power, tunable DWDM SFP transceiver (TRx) that will leverage its patent-protected chirped fiber Bragg grating and its athermal structure technology.

MEL, a startup founded in 2009, announced plans for a low-power, tunable DWDM SFP transceiver (TRx) that will leverage its patent-protected chirped fiber Bragg grating and its athermal structure technology. The transceiver, which MEL has dubbed MLT (for “Mechanically Locked Tunable”), will consume half the power of existing EML-based transceivers and one third of the new tunable transceivers, the company asserts.

The company did not say when the MLT optical transceiver would be available.

The transceiver will offer a tuning range of 40 wavelengths with 100-GHz spacing over the C- or L-Band. Technicians will tune the MLT SFP transceiver by typing in a wavelength number on the panel of an electro-mechanic tuner. Although the wavelength is mechanically locked for the end of transceiver life, if necessary, the wavelength can be re-tuned at different wavelengths repeatedly.

According to Dr. B.W. Kim, the CEO of MEL, "Today's tunable transceivers are the products of lab engineers who had a fixation of changing wavelengths as many [times] as possible, but in reality and practice, you need to seldom change wavelength while in operation for broadband data transport and access networks."

MEL will display the MLT SFP transceiver TOSA, without the actual tuner, at the forthcoming ECOC in Geneva, September 19-21.

For more information on transceivers and suppliers, visit the Lightwave Buyers Guide.

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