CC Communications installs ADC FTTX platform for PON deployment

August 8, 2005 Minneapolis, MN -- ADC, a supplier of infrastructure platforms for FTTX networks, today announced that CC Communications of Fallon, Nevada has, for its passive optical network (PON), installed ADC's OmniReach Fiber Distribution Terminals (FDT).

Aug 8th, 2005

August 8, 2005 Minneapolis, MN -- ADC, a supplier of infrastructure platforms for FTTX networks, today announced that CC Communications of Fallon, Nevada has, for its passive optical network (PON), installed ADC's OmniReach Fiber Distribution Terminals (FDT).

"We sought to build a future-proof infrastructure so that the outside plant won't become obsolete as we change electronics and add applications," explains Dave Tilley, broadband supervisor for CC Communications. "By centralizing splitters in neighborhood cross-connect cabinets, we will be able to quickly adapt the outside plant as we add subscribers and continue to add new services such as voice over IP, security, surveillance, and others for our subscribers."

ADC says its OmniReach FDTs allow the telephone company to centralize splitters in the field. Designed specifically for FTTX applications, the company says the FDT, designed to provide physical layer access to feeder and distribution networks, incorporates integrated bend radius protection, logical cable routing, and physical protection for cables and jumpers. The company says its FDT offers multiple splitter options, as well as a choice of connectorization, or splicing options, of input fiber.

CC Communications, a county-owned telephone company, says it made a strategic decision to extend fiber throughout its outside plant in order to provide up to 100 Mbit/sec of bandwidth for each of its customer. Using the ADC equipment, the company says it can now offer basic telephone, long distance, Internet, and interactive TV services over its FTTH network. The company notes that it is also offering IP video services instead of an RF overlay for delivery of basic TV, video on demand, and other video services.

To deliver 100 Mbit/sec service to each home, the telephone company notes that it required the FDTs to house 1 x 8 splitters instead of 1 x 32 splitters. To make sure each FDT could properly manage up to four splitter input pigtails, ADC developed engineering changes and deployed a field modification for the FDTs, prior to service turn-up.

"We are proud of the responsiveness and flexibility we have developed in our engineering and manufacturing processes," comments Pat O'Brien, president of ADC's Global Connectivity Solutions business unit. "As a result, we are able to provide FTTX solutions that match the unique network requirements for any service provider."

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