Zarlink's TDM-over-IP packet processors nabs four design wins

August 5, 2004 Ottawa, Canada -- Zarlink Semiconductor has announced that four equipment manufacturers in the United States and Korea--Comtec Systems, Eagle Telephonics, Intronics Inc., and Rivertree Networks--are developing a range of networking equipment based on the ZL50111 family of TDM-over-Internet Protocol (IP) packet processors.

Aug 5th, 2004

August 5, 2004 Ottawa, Canada -- Zarlink Semiconductor has announced that four equipment manufacturers in the United States and Korea--Comtec Systems, Eagle Telephonics, Intronics Inc., and Rivertree Networks--are developing a range of networking equipment based on the ZL50111 family of TDM-over-Internet Protocol (IP) packet processors. The companies are designing media gateways, central office, and Ethernet switching products that transport legacy TDM services over packet networks.

Zarlink's ZL50111 TDM-over-IP packet processors transparently tunnel any type of Layer 2 TDM traffic, with associated timing and signaling, across any IP, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS), or Ethernet network.

"Equipment manufacturers are using Zarlink's TDM-over-IP processors to help carriers and service providers build out packet-based networks without disturbing existing services, revenues, or installed infrastructure," explains Jeremy Lewis, product line marketing manager, Zarlink Semiconductor. "Customers are selecting Zarlink because we have the industry's broadest range of TDM-over-IP packet processors capable of handling 4, 8, or 32 steams per package while utilizing the same application program interface."

Intronics Inc., headquartered in the United States, is developing TDM-over-IP media gateways to transport point-to-point, aggregated or distributed T1/E1 or T3/E3 TDM traffic over any local, metropolitan, or continental IP network. Additionally, Comtec Systems of Korea is marketing a module-based TDM-over-IP media gateway that allows customers to choose from 4-, 8-, or 16-port versions as network traffic demands dictate.

Service providers deploying a media gateway powered by Zarlink's TDM-over-IP technology can reduce operating costs by eliminating leased trunk lines and support a greater range of services, including TDM-over-packet, without requiring a forklift upgrade of installed network equipment, contend Zarlink representatives. Similarly, a cellular service provider currently leasing a costly fixed line to connect a wireless base station and a switching center could instead emulate TDM voice traffic across an Ethernet network with no noticeable change in voice quality for the end-user.

US-based Eagle Telephonics has developed a distributed central office network infrastructure for public switched telephone networks. Incorporating Zarlink's ZL50111 TDM-over-IP processor family, Eagle Telephonics network switches will be linked via an Ethernet or IP network, reducing operating and network management expenses by carrying all voice and data traffic over a single converged network. Previously, multiple on-site cabinets were interconnected by E1 lines. In addition, a line card slot that had been required for the E1 interconnection is freed up, allowing the network to handle increased services.

Converged services over Ethernet
As Ethernet switches increasingly dominate the enterprise, service providers are seeking opportunities to offer new revenue-generating applications while customers are considering migrating their voice services to the packet connection.

Rivertree Networks is currently developing a Multi-Service Access Ethernet Switching family, using Zarlink's TDM-over-IP devices to carry legacy traffic across a packet-switched network (PSN). The Korean-based company's Layer 2 IP switches support different levels of service, from four T1/E1 lines and two Fast Ethernet ports to 32 T1/E1 lines and three Fast Ethernet ports.

Rivertree Networks' switching family provides an inexpensive migration route towards an all-IP network. Service providers can carry voice, ATM, and Frame Relay services over the Ethernet network, thereby reducing leased line costs. Enterprise customers can easily roll out virtual private network (VPN) and voice-over-packet services across a PSN without requiring equipment upgrades or compromising current telephony features.

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