FCC releases data on high-speed services for Internet access

MARCH 20, 2008 -- The FCC finds that high-speed connections to the Internet increased by 22% during the first half of 2007, from 82.8 million to 100.9 million lines in service.

MARCH 20, 2008 -- The Federal Communications Commission (search for FCC) yesterday released new data on high-speed connections to the Internet in the United States. Twice a year, all facilities-based broadband providers are required to report to the Commission basic information about their service offerings and types of customers pursuant to the FCC's local telephone competition and broadband data gathering program (FCC Form 477). Statistics released yesterday reflect data as of June 30, 2007.

For reporting purposes, high-speed lines are connections that deliver services at speeds exceeding 200 Kbit/sec in at least one direction, while advanced services lines are connections that deliver services at speeds exceeding 200 Kbits/sec in both directions. High-speed lines encompass advanced services lines. (Commencing with the June 2005 data, the FCC says it collects and reports more detailed information about the speeds of in-service lines, provides finer distinctions among technologies, and collects and analyzes information about the availability of high-speed DSL connections from incumbent LECs and high-speed cable modem service from cable TV system operators. Also commencing with the June 2005 data, providers with fewer than 250 high-speed connections in service to end users in a particular state are no longer excused from reporting data for that state.)

High-speed lines

• The FCC finds that high-speed lines increased by 22% during the first half of 2007, from 82.8 million to 100.9 million lines in service, following a 27% increase, from 65.3 million to 82.8 million lines, during the second half of 2006. For the full twelve-month period ending June 30, 2007, high-speed lines increased by 55% from 65.3 million to 100.9 million (or 35.7 million lines) compared to a 54% increase, from 42.5 million to 65.3 million lines (or 22.8 million lines), in the twelve-month period ending June 30, 2006.

• Of the 100.9 million total high-speed lines reported as of June 30, 2007, 65.9 million served primarily residential end users. Cable modem service represented 50.6% of these lines, while 37.5% were ADSL connections, 0.2% were symmetric DSL or traditional wireline connections, 1.7% were fiber connections to the end user premises, and 10.0% used other types of technology, including satellite, terrestrial fixed or mobile wireless (on a licensed or unlicensed basis), and electric power line.

• High-speed ADSL increased by 2.1 million lines during the first half of 2007, fiber connections increased by 0.4 million lines, and cable modem service increased by 2.4 million lines. For the full twelve-month period ending June 30, 2007, ADSL increased by 4.9 million lines, fiber connections increased by 0.7 million lines, and cable modem service increased by 5.2 million lines.

Advanced services lines

• Advanced services lines, which deliver services at speeds exceeding 200 Kbits/sec in both directions, increased by 16% during the first half of 2007, from 59.8 million to 69.6 million lines, compared to a 17% increase, from 51.1 million to 59.8 million lines, during the second half of 2006. For the full twelve-month period ending June 30, 2007, advanced services lines increased 36% from 51.1 million to 69.6 million (or 18.5 million lines).

• Of the 69.6 million advanced services lines reported as of June 30, 2007, 59.8% were at least 2.5 Mbits/sec in the faster direction, and 40.2% were slower than 2.5 Mbits/sec in the faster direction.

• Of the 69.6 million advanced services lines, 61.1 million served primarily residential end users. Cable modem service represented 53.9% of these lines, while 34.1% were ADSL connections, 0.2% were SDSL or traditional wireline connections, 1.9% were fiber connections to the end user premises, and 10.0% used other types of technology, including satellite, terrestrial fixed or mobile wireless (on a licensed or unlicensed basis), and electric power line.

Geographic coverage

• As a nationwide average, the FCC estimates that high-speed DSL connections were available to 82% of the households to whom incumbent LECs could provide local telephone service as of June 30, 2007. Further, the FCC estimates that high-speed cable modem service was available to 96% of the households to whom cable system operators could provide cable TV service.

• Providers list the Zip Codes in which they have at least one high-speed connection in service to an end user, and over 99% of Zip Codes were listed by at least one provider. FCC analysis indicates that more than 99% of the nation's population lives in those Zip Codes. The most widely reported technologies by this measure were high-speed mobile wireless (with at least some presence reported in 96% of Zip Codes), satellite (in 92% of Zip Codes), ADSL (in 85% of Zip Codes), and cable modem service (in 66% of Zip Codes). ADSL and/or cable modem connections were reported to be present in 90% of Zip Codes.

The summary statistics released yesterday also include state-by-state information and population density and household income information ranked by Zip Codes.

The report can also be downloaded from the Wireline Competition Bureau Statistical Reports Internet site at www.fcc.gov/wcb/stats.

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