Alcatel-Lucent offers VSDL2 vectoring to support 100-Mbps services

Alcatel-Lucent (Euronext Paris and NYSE: ALU) has announced commercial availability of its version of VDSL2 Vectoring technology. The new capability, compliant to the ITU-T’s G.vector specifications, is a noise cancelling technology that, when paired with channel bonding, can enable 100-Mbps service delivery to residences and businesses via VDSL2 networks.

Alcatel-Lucent (Euronext Paris and NYSE: ALU) has announced commercial availability of its version of VDSL2 Vectoring technology. The new capability, compliant to the ITU-T’s G.vector specifications, is a noise cancelling technology that, when paired with channel bonding, can enable 100-Mbps service delivery to residences and businesses via VDSL2 networks.

According to Keith Russell, senior marketing manager, Wireline Fixed Access at Alcatel-Lucent, the VDSL2 Vectoring technology is based on in-house expertise and will support the 100-Mbps speeds over a distance of 400 m, or lower data rates over longer distances, thanks to its ability to eliminate cross-talk. At least six carriers have trialed the technology, and the company plans to announce a customer next week, he says. While the vectoring technology will be available this year, the ability to pair it with bonding will not be released until the first half of next year, Russell reveals.

VDSL2 Vectoring is available as line card upgrades to Alcatel-Lucent’s 7356 ISAM REM (FD-2), 7330 ISAM FTTN (FD-8), and 7302 ISAM (FD-16) platforms. A Board-Level Vectoring card supports smaller applications and operates independently, while the pairing of multiple System-Level Vectoring (SLV) line cards and a Vectoring Processor line card can apply vectoring across an entire system. The Vectoring Processor card will oversee four SLV cards in the initial release; Alcatel-Lucent will expand its capacity to eight SLVs next year. Both the SLVs and the Board-Level Vectoring card will support 48-port operation and two- to eight-pair bonding.

Russell couched the technology in the context of the worldwide trend toward national broadband programs. While many such programs emphasize fiber to the home (FTTH), the VDSL2 technology will enable carriers to meet broadband service deployment objectives more quickly over existing infrastructure, he says.

Rob Gallagher, principal analyst and head of Broadband & TV Research at market research and analysis firm Informa -- who has advocated that FTTH is unnecessary in many cases to meet broadband service objectives -- welcomed the announcement. “Alcatel-Lucent's plan to make VDSL2 vectoring commercially available is very timely,” said Gallagher in a quote provided to the press. “Service providers and governments have stated their intent to boost broadband speeds to consumers and businesses alike, but the challenges associated with comprehensive fiber-to-the-home deployments have been a major obstacle. VDSL2 Vectoring promises to bring speeds of 100 Mbps and beyond to advanced copper/fiber hybrid networks and make superfast broadband speeds available to many more people, much faster than many in the industry had thought possible.”

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