Armstrong selects Alloptic for FTTP deployment in Butler County, PA

June 13, 2007
JUNE 13, 2007 -- "The MicroNode allows Armstrong to take HFC to one home per node instead of the traditional two hundred and fifty homes-passed per node," says Armstrong CTO Mike Giobbi. "I refer to the architecture as HFc--little 'c'--since the only coax is in the customer's home."

JUNE 13, 2007 -- Armstrong, a division of Armstrong Group of Companies, located in Butler, PA, has selected Alloptic Inc.'s (search for Alloptic) MicroNode as its fiber-to-the-home (search for FTTH) technology, with the first major project starting in Butler County.

"The MicroNode allows Armstrong to take HFC to one home per node instead of the traditional two hundred and fifty homes-passed per node," explains Mike Giobbi, CTO of Armstrong. "I refer to the architecture as HFc--little 'c'--since the only coax is in the customer's home. This preserves the investment in our video, DOCSIS (search for DOCSIS), and PacketCable infrastructures along with digital set-tops, cable modems, and MTAs," he says. Giobbi notes that cost savings also can be achieved by eliminating maintenance functions such as sweeping and Signal Leakage drive-outs.

"Armstrong had the opportunity of a Greenfield development where they could install any technology they wanted," recalls Shane Eleniak, vice president of marketing and business development for Alloptic. "We are pleased they chose Alloptic's deep fiber MicroNode solution, which lets Armstrong install the completely passive fiber network today while continuing to use their current headend, set top box, and modem equipment. This enables them to readily migrate to an ultra high-speed network, as customers, applications, and services require, without expensive and time-consuming outside plant changes," he adds. "Armstrong is another of our customers finding that a deep fiber strategy makes superior financial, operational, and strategic sense."


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