Open Fiber chooses Nokia for rural FTTH network build in Italy

Italy’s Open Fiber will use fiber broadband transmission equipment from Nokia in a rural-focused fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) deployment. The service provider, Italy’s only operator of wholesale open broadband network infrastructure, will use Nokia’s FTTH gear in two of the four “clusters” the Italian government has established as part of its plans for a national FTTH network.

Italy’s Open Fiber will use fiber broadband transmission equipment from Nokia in a rural-focused fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) deployment. The service provider, Italy’s only operator of wholesale open broadband network infrastructure, will use Nokia’s FTTH gear in two of the four “clusters” the Italian government has established as part of its plans for a national FTTH network.

Open Fiber, jointly owned by state-run utility Enel and state lender Cassa Depositi e Prestiti, expects to be able to support gigabit broadband services using Nokia’s equipment. The technology company will supply its 7360 ISAM FX-16 and FX-4 access nodes, the smaller form factor 7362 Dense Fiber - 16GW access node, 7368 ISAM ONTs, and 5520 AMS Element Manager. Open Fiber plans to use Nokia’s FTTH systems in the C and D clusters the Italian government has established. These so-called white areas have comparatively little FTTH infrastructure in place and are generally rural and underserved (see "Italtel and Open Fiber extend ultra-broadband network partnership for underserved areas of Italy"). The A and B clusters contain more populated areas that have enjoyed greater infrastructure investment.

"We have selected Nokia as our supplier in clusters C and D to deliver giga-services and pave the way for future ultrabroadband technology evolutions. We are sure that Nokia's extensive experience in fixed networks will enable us to build an efficient network that uses best-of-breed components and technologies,” commented Stefano Paggi, network and operations director at Open Fiber. “With Nokia's solutions we will be able to offer services at 10 Gbps and in the future at 40 Gbps on the access network. We will also have the opportunity to adopt the SDAN (software-defined networking) paradigm and therefore to maximize the potential of a new-generation access network, with high automation, programmable, and integrated with cloud environments.

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