Analog Devices intros low power crosspoint switch for high-speed networking applications

26 June 2003 Norwood, MA Lightwave -- Analog Devices Inc. this week introduced what it claims is the industry's lowest power, synchronous crosspoint switch. The new chip is designed to solve the difficult signal-integrity, density, and low-power design challenges inherent within packet and cell-based switching and routing systems that drive enterprise/SAN, access, and metro networks.

26 June 2003 Norwood, MA Lightwave -- Analog Devices Inc. this week introduced what it claims is the industry's lowest power, synchronous crosspoint switch. The new chip is designed to solve the difficult signal-integrity, density, and low-power design challenges inherent within packet and cell-based switching and routing systems that drive enterprise/SAN, access, and metro networks.

At 5 watts, the ADSX34 consumes one-third the power of comparable products on the market, say company representatives. The device, which joins ADI's Xstream family of low-power crosspoint switches, integrates 34 SERDES channels, equalization, and other added features, making it a complete solution for high-speed networks. The device's low power consumption reduces the need for expensive, space-consuming heat sinks and other thermal management components.

"Network equipment providers are looking to develop unified low-cost, flexible platforms that can scale from enterprise to edge aggregation and core applications," explains Jay Cormier, product line director for high-speed switches, Analog Devices. "Our ADSX34 allows multi-protocol switching, while solving the difficult analog issues of signal integrity and power. This enables OEMs to develop equipment on time, on budget and with system flexibility."

The ADSX34 also features:
• 34 highly integrated channels operating up to 3.125 Gbits/sec each
• Per-channel programmable receive equalization and transmit pre-emphasis that allows equalization over 30 inches of FR4 material, including two standard high-density differential connectors
• Supports timeslots from 24 to 4,000 characters
• Per-channel time slot synchronization FIFOs absorb up to 128 bytes of variation in packet arrival times, simplifying system timing

The versatility of the ADSX34 makes it ideal for multi-service environments, says the company. The ADSX34 can switch any form of packet or cell-based traffic, including ATM, Ethernet, fiber channel, Serial Rapid I/O, or Internet protocol, eliminating the need to design multiple switches for different protocols. For a complete L2/L3 packet-switching system, the ADSX34 can be used in conjunction with Sandburst Corporation's HIBEAM packet-switching chipset. HIBEAM is an implementation of the company's SANDWORKS Foundation Architecture. For more information, visit
www.sandburst.com.

The ADSX34 will sample in September 2003, with full production expected in January 2004. It will be packaged in a 31mm x 31mm, 304-ball thermally-enhanced EBGA with 1.27 mm ball pitch package and will be priced at $395.00 per unit in 100-piece quantities. The ADSX34 operates over the industrial temperature range of 0 ° C to +85 ° C.

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