Fujitsu, Indiana U. collaborate on optical communications research

APRIL 17, 2008 -- Fujitsu Network Communications reveals that it is collaborating with Indiana University on research about the effects that polarization mode dispersion (PMD) can have on specific wavelengths traveling at 40 Gbits/sec or more.

APRIL 17, 2008 -- Fujitsu Network Communications (search for Fujitsu Network Communications) reveals that it is collaborating with Indiana University (IU) on research about the effects that polarization mode dispersion (PMD) can have on specific wavelengths traveling at 40 Gbits/sec or more. Fujitsu says the collaboration will be the model for future research networking experiments with other research and education (R&E) institutions.

The Global Research Network Operations Center (GRNOC) of IU is providing dark fiber between Indianapolis and Bloomington, IN, plus access to patch panels, electrical power, the Internet, and physical space to conduct the tests. Fujitsu and IU collaborated on the test plan to ensure that collected data can be used to influence future optical networking research and commercial products. Fujitsu researchers have conducted tests over a seven-month period (with at least five more months of experiments planned), and IU is supporting the configuration changes during the testing phase. Fujitsu and IU are examining the test results, and have co-authored several technical papers about their findings, including one that was presented at the recent OFC/NFOEC conference and exhibition in San Diego, and one that will be presented at the OECC/ACOFT 2008 conference in Australia. Additional results will be presented at the upcoming Internet2 Joint Techs Workshop in July 2008.

According to Brad Wheeler, vice president for information technology and CIO at Indiana University, "Our collaboration with Fujitsu has allowed us to interact with the scientists from one of the leading research entities in optical networking. Together, using advanced technology from Fujitsu, we were able to discover several optical characteristics that will have a profound implication on high-speed networking across the globe. Our experience continues to be extremely positive, and we look forward to future research projects with Fujitsu."

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