CommScope’s E2O cable combines fiber and coax

March 1, 2013
After showing it off at last fall’s SCTE Cable-Tec Expo, CommScope has announced the official commercial launch of its E2O (Electrical to Optical) hybrid cabling system. The cabling system combines optical fiber with coax to meet the needs of cable MSOs who are still relying on coax, but know they’ll need fiber deeper in their networks in the future.

After showing it off at last fall’s SCTE Cable-Tec Expo, CommScope has announced the commercial launch of its E2O (Electrical to Optical) hybrid cabling system. The cabling system combines optical fiber with coax to meet the needs of cable MSOs who are still relying on coax, but know they’ll need fiber deeper in their networks in the future.

The cable saves space and improves installation efficiency by combining optical fiber with coax in a single sheath. The smaller resulting size means the E2O cables are compatible with CommScope’s line of microducts and microcables.

CommScope believes the E2O cable particularly will benefit cable operators who plan to launch fiber-based business services branching off of their hybrid fiber/coax (HFC) networks.

“MSOs want to expand services, including high-speed Internet and video, to businesses today using coaxial cable as the final connection to the building,” said Doug Wells, vice president, Outside Plant Solutions, Broadband, CommScope. “It’s a given that those same businesses will require higher data rate services and more bandwidth in the future. Those needs will be met using optical fiber; however, the challenge for MSOs is assuring they are ready to build an optical fiber network in that area at the lowest possible incremental cost.”

With the E2O cables, MSOs can install either a conduit for blown fiber and/or a fiber cable for later use when higher-bandwidth services are required. Operators also can deploy fiber to a business park and reserve the coaxial cable within the same sheath in case commercial customers later request video services.

“Because of this single sheath, E2O can help mitigate current and future installation costs while ensuring future migration strategies including PON, RFoG, and other FTTx technologies,” Wells added. “Whether an operator needs to reconfigure, maintain, or replace their HFC residential services, deploying E2O helps ‘future proof’ their network for when fiber is eventually needed. If their strategy is to install coaxial cable integrated with fiber or conduit for future fiber blow-in, or both, operators can once again minimize expenses by installing all under one sheath at the same time.”

For more information on cabling and suppliers, visit the Lightwave Buyer’s Guide.

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