Aurora Networks unveils Distributed Broadband Access Architecture

Aurora Networks, Inc., which offers optical transmission technology to the cable MSO community, is using The Cable Show this week in Washington, DC, to launch its Distributed Broadband Access Architecture family.

Jun 11th, 2013

Aurora Networks, Inc., which offers optical transmission technology to the cable MSO community, is using The Cable Show this week in Washington, DC, to launch its Distributed Broadband Access Architecture family.

The Distributed Broadband Access Architecture leverages Aurora Networks’ Node QAM technology to extend digital headend functions to the optical node. Specifically, the architecture enables the digital-RF interface to migrate from the headend to the node. Digital content is sent to the node via baseband, data-grade optics; QAM modulation capabilities move to the nodes as well. The architecture saves space and power requirements at the headend, says Aurora Networks sources.

The architecture supports the delivery of any mix of services, including broadcast, narrowcast, cable IPTV, and DOCSIS, even in the same QAM channel, Aurora Networks states. Operators can tailor service migration and growth to local needs and specifications. The architecture also will support EPON over coax (EPoC) when that technology becomes available, says company sources.

“Operators will continue to see an increased demand for capacity, but in order to add premium services and maintain cost efficiency, they need to implement a Distributed Broadband Access Architecture,” said John Dahlquist, vice president of marketing, Aurora Networks, via a press release. “This solution allows operators to simplify the cost and complexity of their networks and when combined with the Node QAM, there is no better solution positioned to save operators money, and simultaneously, solving the ever-increasing bandwidth challenge.”

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