Hibernia Atlantic plots transatlantic 100G course after trials with Huawei

Having run technology from Huawei through its paces, with help from Huawei Marine, Hibernia Atlantic will deploy 100-Gbps between Halifax and Montreal and between Amsterdam and London by the first quarter of next year, with other deployments to follow.

Transatlantic fiber-optic network services supplier Hibernia Atlantic says it plans to deploy 100-Gbps technology on several legs of its network after successful trails of the technology. Having run technology from Huawei through its paces, with help from Huawei Marine, Hibernia Atlantic will deploy 100-Gbps between Halifax and Montreal and between Amsterdam and London by the first quarter of next year, with other deployments to follow.

“Additional capacity to our existing network system will provide the ability to meet the growing service needs of our clients,” said Bjarni Thorvardarson, CEO for Hibernia Atlantic, in a press release. “The carrier, multimedia, and enterprise industries all require high capacity at the 100-Gbps level to ensure high-performance data transmissions. In addition, we are deploying Project Express, the first transatlantic, fiber-optic cable with the shortest latency in history at sub-60 milliseconds roundtrip. With this innovative cable link, as well as our existing, diverse cable assets, our clients will now be able to access secure and diverse connectivity at the highest-performance capacity currently available.”

The trial, which Huawei Technologies (USA) Vice President – Optical Network Marketing and Product Management Reg Wilcox told Lightwave occurred within the past month, tested 100-Gbps transmission between Halifax, Nova Scotia and Southport, England, a distance greater than 5,000 km. The demonstration, which Huawei asserts is the 100G test across the Atlantic, included transmission alongside 40-Gbps at 50-GHz spacing. It also demonstrated co-propagation of 100 Gbps at 50-GHz spacing.

The 100-Gbps technology, currently available on Huawei’s OptiX platforms, conforms to the OIF’s specifications, including use of dual-polarization quadrature phase-shift keying (DP-QPSK) with coherent detection. It also benefits from the company’s digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms and forward error correction (FEC) technology.

The 40-Gbps signals involved in the trial used Huawei’s Enhanced DQPSK modulation format. Wilcox says that coherent 40-Gbps technology is coming to market as well.

For more information on high-speed transmission systems and suppliers, visit the Lightwave Buyers Guide.


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