University of Washington deploys XKL's DXM

MAY 5, 2008 -- The University of Washington in Seattle has deployed the XKL DXM optical transport system to support a fiber network from its main data center to the campus. The network is designed to transport multiple services, including Gigabit Ethernet, 10 Gigabit Ethernet, SONET, and Fibre Channel.

MAY 5, 2008 -- Enterprise network equipment provider XKL LLC (search for XKL) today announced the University of Washington in Seattle has deployed the XKL DXM optical transport system to drive a fiber network, providing the university with an upgrade in available bandwidth and room for future growth.

The network runs from the university's main data center to the campus and has the ability to transport multiple services, including 10 Gigabit Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, SONET, and Fibre Channel. With cost-free scaling up to 10 network services and system capacity up to 40, the DXM provides the University of Washington substantial flexibility for the future, claim university representatives.

"We were interested in the XKL DXM because of its management similarity to our routers and switches," reports David Sinn, UW network engineer. "With this gear, any of our network engineers can deploy and manage metro optical services as needed. On top of that, XKL provides a strong value proposition."

Led by Cisco Systems co-founder Len Bosack, XKL's technology allows IT departments to bypass expensive external telecom carrier services by deploying and managing their own metro optical networks, say XKL representatives. They say the DXM offers ease of deployment and management for enterprise fiber networks in a space and power-efficient package.

"We're thrilled this prestigious university has chosen XKL's solution for this network," notes Bosack, who serves as XKL's CEO. "They see the advantage of the DXM being easily deployable and manageable without employing optical engineers or bearing a large support contract. This fiber network was deployed using the skills their engineers already have," he explains, "and we look forward to working with the UW on additional regional deployments, which will feature some exciting new enhancements to the DXM product line."

XKL says its architecture provides optical transport with an easy to use router-like management structure. This includes well-known standards such as a familiar command line interface, SNMP, and an independent TCP/IP management network. As a result, the DXM can be quickly deployed, scaled, and managed without employing trained optical engineers or bearing a large support contract, claim company representatives. Simply install it in a rack, make the proper connections, and realize carrier-class optical transport, they say.


Visit XKL

More in Network Design