OpVista's AnyWave approach paves the way for Carrier Ethernet transport networks

March 28, 2007
MARCH 28, 2007 -- OpVista claims that by simply installing its products into existing network infrastructures, service providers can now obtain a carrier-class (meaning 99.999% reliability) Ethernet transport backbone, easily and cost-effectively.

MARCH 28, 2007 -- OpVista (search for OpVista) has unveiled the AnyWave Optical Network, a networking approach that the company says will allow service providers to achieve reliable carrier-class Ethernet services over existing network infrastructure. Service providers are eager to adopt the Carrier Ethernet transport (CET) model to reap the many advantages of Ethernet and IP, such as converged networks with flexible service provisioning and high-capacity wavelength (DWDM) links, to handle the growing onslaught of video and other high-bandwidth traffic. OpVista claims that by simply installing its products into existing network infrastructures, service providers can now obtain a carrier-class (meaning 99.999% reliability) Ethernet transport backbone, easily and cost-effectively.

The AnyWave approach represents a departure from other recently introduced CET strategies that require "forklift" upgrades or lack capacity and scalability to support true next-gen services. AnyWave's complete adherence to all international standards and interoperability with existing DWDM systems eliminates the need for costly additional investments—for instance, in new fiber to accommodate higher bit-rate links or "forklift upgrades" to add capacity.

OpVista reports that carriers such as Cox Communications and Time Warner Communications are developing AnyWave networks to meet end-user demand for high-bandwidth services.

The AnyWave components use patented and standards-compliant techniques to exponentially expand the number of available wavelengths in the network— a completely reconfigurable (ROADM) setting—and then add higher-order network intelligence to create a service-independent transport network. Network functions will be provided by the company's Ultra-DWDM and ROADM technologies, WaveWeaver, Switched Ring Architecture (SRA), and EtherWave (to be installed in the OpVista 2000 platform).

The networking approach offers single-wavelength granularity, so carriers can turn on and off service one wavelength at a time, at any network node and via any network path (e.g., ring or point-to-point). The resulting advanced switched ring architecture gives service providers the ability to offer many types of guaranteed services (in the form of service-level agreements).

OpVista made the announcement concurrent with OFC/NFOEC 2007, in Anaheim, CA, and will be chairing a panel on "Escalating Bandwidth Demands in Enterprise Networking" on March 29, from 1:30-3:30pm.


Visit OpVista