Fujitsu Network Communications test 800-Gbps superchannels with Mid-Atlantic Crossroads

Research and education network provider Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX) and optical transport systems vendor Fujitsu Network Communications, Inc. (FNC) say they have collaborated to demonstrate both 400-Gbps and 800-Gbps superchannels. The field trial used a link running from Baltimore, MD, to McLean, VA, on MAX’s research and development network and prototype superchannel technology, according to an FNC source.

Research and education network provider Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX) and optical transport systems vendor Fujitsu Network Communications, Inc. (FNC) say they have collaborated to demonstrate both 400-Gbps and 800-Gbps superchannels. The field trial used a link running from Baltimore, MD, to McLean, VA, on MAX’s research and development network and prototype superchannel technology, according to an FNC source.

MAX is an FNC customer (see “Mid-Atlantic Crossroads uses Fujitsu FLASHWAVE 9500 for 100-Gbps network”), and the trial used FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet Optical Networking Platforms already in MAX’s possession augmented with the prototype technology, according to Mike Sabelhaus, director, product planning, at FNC. The 400-Gbps superchannels comprised four 100-Gbps carriers that used dual-polarization quadrature phase shift keying (DP-QPSK). The 800-Gbps superchannel leveraged four 200-Gbps carriers with dual-polarization 16-QAM. Spacing between the carriers was 36 GHz, Sabelhaus says.

In addition to being able to demonstrate stable transmission at these high speeds, the trials gave FNC and MAX the opportunity to test various compensation techniques and other transmission aids. These included Nyquist filtering and nonlinear compensation techniques to combat self-phase modulation, according to Sabelhaus.

“This field trial provided a significant opportunity for MAX and Fujitsu to collaborate on a leading technological advancement in the optical networking field,” said Tripti Sinha, executive director of MAX, via a press release. “The achievement of such a fast networking speed will not only benefit MAX participants, but it will also set the standard for the future of advanced networking, helping to unlock previously unavailable resources for researchers across the world.”

Sabelhaus says that while the prototype technology performed well, there are still hurdles to be overcome before such capabilities could reach the market. The development of the necessary ASICs is a key driver, he points out. Sabelhaus believes that full commercialization and delivery of such superchannel technology could be a few years away.

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