Verizon details metro 100G deployments

Verizon (NYSE, NASDAQ: VZ) says it has begun to roll out 100-Gbps capabilities in its metro networks via systems from Fujitsu Network Communications and Tellabs. The service provider is using coherent technology to support the 100-Gbps wavelengths to “gain the same benefits of increased capacity, superior latency and improved scalability in its metro network as it has from deploying 100G technology in its long-haul network,” the company said in a press release.

Apr 15th, 2014

Verizon (NYSE, NASDAQ: VZ) says it has begun to roll out 100-Gbps capabilities in its metro networks via systems from Fujitsu Network Communications and Tellabs. The service provider is using coherent transmission technology to support the 100-Gbps wavelengths to “gain the same benefits of increased capacity, superior latency and improved scalability in its metro network as it has from deploying 100G technology in its long-haul network,” the company said in a press release.

“Metro deployment of 100G technology is the natural progression of Verizon’s aggressive deployment of 100G technology in its long-haul network,” said Lee Hicks, vice president of Verizon Network Planning. “It’s time to gain the same efficiencies in the metro network that we have in the long-haul network. By taking the long view, we’re staying ahead of network needs and customer demands as well as preparing for next-generation services.”

Those efficiencies include improved signal performance at 100G versus 10 aggregated 10-Gbps wavelengths as well as savings in space and power.

However, not every Verizon metro network will see 100G during the current deployment. Verizon will target metro areas where “traffic demand is highest,” the company said. The company did not identify which markets will see the deployments.

“We see the value today of starting deployment of 100G in the metro, since 100G technology has performance improvements over 10G,” explained Hicks. “But the cost-per-bit of 100G in the metro currently isn’t as cost-effective as it is in the long-haul network, so 100G in the metro won’t be the default technology for a while.”

Fujitsu and Tellabs (which is in the process of being merged into Coriant after being acquired by Marlin Equity Partners; see “Marlin Equity Partners reshuffles executive deck ahead of Coriant, Tellabs merger”) are no doubt happy nonetheless. Verizon is using Fujitsu’s FLASHWAVE 9500 and the Tellabs 7100 for the 100G upgrades. Both companies have supplied equipment to Verizon for several years (see "Verizon selects Fujitsu packet ONP for transport infrastructure" and "Tellabs wins Verizon deal").

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Want to learn more about 100G innovation? Attend the Lightwave Optical Innovation Summit The Lightwave Optical Innovation Summit will feature panels and presentations that will illuminate where optical innovation is required in carrier and enterprise/data center networks, what it should look like, and when it might appear. A wide range of experts from the user, technology development, academic, and analyst communities will offer their views on innovation in a variety of areas, including 100G. Find out more about the Summit, which will be held in Austin, TX, July 14-16, at the Lightwave Optical Innovation Summit website.

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