ADVA's 100G Metro transports data over 600 km of Corning optical fiber

ADVA Optical Networking (FSE: ADV) and Corning Inc. (NYSE:GLW) report that ADVA’s 100G Metro technology has been used to successfully transport data over 600 km of Corning LEAF optical fiber. The demonstration represents the first time that direct-detection 100G technology has been used outside of the metro environment and positions it as a viable 100G option for regional fiber-optic networks, the companies assert.

Oct 16th, 2012

ADVA Optical Networking (FSE: ADV) and Corning Inc. (NYSE:GLW) report that ADVA’s 100G Metro technology has been used to successfully transport data over 600 km of Corning LEAF optical fiber. The demonstration represents the first time that direct-detection 100G technology has been used outside of the metro environment and positions it as a viable 100G option for regional fiber-optic networks, the companies assert.

The joint demonstration was conducted at ADVA Optical Networking's Meiningen campus in Germany and used the ADVA FSP 3000 with inline amplification and Corning LEAF fiber.

"Our 100G Metro solution has been an incredible success story," said Stephan Rettenberger, vice president of marketing for ADVA Optical Networking. "It was built as a direct response to our customers' demands for an efficient 100G solution designed specifically for the needs of the metro environment. Since its launch, our customers' feedback has been clear: take the 100G Metro farther. Consequently, our team has been working hard to push the limits of the 100G Metro. With this demonstration, supported by Corning's optical fiber technology, we've shown that it can now transport data across distances of over 600 km. The implications for service providers and enterprises that want to deploy 100G are enormous."

ADVA’s 100G metro solution is built on 4x28G direct detection technology that delivers improvements in cost, space, and power versus coherent-based alternatives (see “ADVA demos serial 100G transmission for metro/regional applications”). These efficiencies are critical for service providers and enterprises that want to deploy 100G solutions in the metro environment, but do not want the cost, power consumption, or footprint of coherent technology, ADVA says.

When this technology is combined with Corning LEAF fiber (a low-loss, non-zero dispersion shifted fiber), the result is a cost-effective 100G technology that extends beyond the metro and into regional networks, according to the two companies. The optimized dispersion properties of LEAF fiber require that dispersion compensation modules (DCMs) be used only in the terminals at the ends of the link. Using both DCMs and inline amplifiers can save money compared to the requirements of networks using standard singlemode fiber.

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