Seaborn Networks Seabras-1 submarine cable to connect New York City with Sao Paulo

Seaborn Networks says that its previously announced Seabras-1 submarine cable system between Brazil and the U.S. will land in the New York metropolitan area. The new U.S. landing point will position the undersea cable system to link the commercial and financial centers of the two countries.

Jul 30th, 2012

Seaborn Networks says that its previously announced Seabras-1 submarine cable system between Brazil and the U.S. will land in the New York metropolitan area. The new U.S. landing point will position the undersea cable system to link the commercial and financial centers of the two countries.

In addition to the New York landing site, the 32-Tbps Seabras-1 submarine fiber-optic cable system will connect directly to a landing station in Sao Paulo. The submarine cable system also will have a branch that lands in Fortaleza, Brazil.

Scheduled for activation in 2014, Seabras-1 will provide PoP-to-PoP capacity, with plans to make available a route from all three of its landings to the NAP of the Americas and other PoPs in Miami.

The direct route between Sao Paulo and New York offers several advantages, Seaborn Networks asserts:

  • low latency, on the order of 104 ms for PoP-to-PoP service between the two end points
  • a shorter distance to most of the Mid-Atlantic region of the US than a landing in Miami
  • lower costs
  • onward connectivity to rest of world because of New York’s international gateway capabilities
  • more reliable connections than existing US – Brazil systems, who operated more than 2.3X the number of active elements in their networks
  • improved route diversity with no dependencies on hurricane-prone Florida.

"The decision to land in the New York metropolitan area instead of Miami is in response to significant customer demand,” said Larry Schwartz, Seaborn Networks’ CEO. “By offering improvements to latency, onward connectivity, and reliability, Seabras-1 is a compelling choice for carriers, content providers, governments, and others that value a direct, low-latency route between the commercial and financial centers of Brazil and the United States.”

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