Huawei touts prototype flexible grid WDM

Huawei says it has developed a flexible-grid WDM prototype with a minimum granularity of 12.5 GHz. The prototype aims to address emerging requirements for multi-carrier technologies and bandwidth-flexible optical networks that will support data rates beyond 100 Gbps.

Huawei says it has developed a flexible-grid WDM prototype with a minimum granularity of 12.5 GHz. The prototype aims to address emerging requirements for multi-carrier technologies and bandwidth-flexible optical networks that will support data rates beyond 100 Gbps.

Flexible grid wavelength-selective switches (WSS) have reached the market over the past year or so, starting with Finisar (see “Finisar unveils Flexgrid wavelength-selective switches for next-gen ROADMs”) and most recently from the likes of JDSU (see “ROADM advances: An OFC/NFOEC 2012 Reporter's Notebook”). The WSS modules come in anticipation that future 400-Gbps and 1-Tbps transmission will require moving off of the ITU-specified 50-GHz spectrum grid to accommodate multi-carrier-based superchannels.

Huawei’s prototype appears to follow this lead. The WDM prototype supports 40G, 100G, 400G, and 1-Tbps hybrid transmissions and is compatible with legacy 50-GHz and even 25-GHz systems, the company says. Meanwhile, it will support a smooth evolution from 40G and 100G systems to 400G and 1-Tbps platforms and networks.

According to Jack Wang, president of Huawei Transport Network Product Line, "After releasing the world’s first 10 petabit all-optical switch prototype and the 400G DWDM prototype, Huawei has provided a preview of next-generation optical networks by unveiling the highest efficiency spectrum WDM prototype. Huawei is committed to providing innovative solutions in the field of optical networks and to making significant contributions in broadband network construction to further develop next-generation optical transmission technologies."

The company did not reveal when the technology would achieve commercial availability.

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