Sycamore adds GMPLS and UNI 1.0 capability to SN 16000 intelligent optical switch

22 April 2003 Chelmsford, MA Lightwave -- Sycamore Networks Inc. today announced the availability of the IETF's emerging Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) protocols and the OIF's User-to-Network Interface (UNI) 1.0 for the SN 16000 intelligent optical switch. The company claims it is the first to announce the availability of both GMPLS and UNI 1.0 on its intelligent optical switches.

22 April 2003 Chelmsford, MA Lightwave -- Sycamore Networks Inc. today announced the availability of the Internet Engineering Task Force's (IETF) emerging Generalized Multi- Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) protocols and the Optical Internetworking Forum's (OIF) User-to-Network Interface (UNI) 1.0 for the SN 16000 intelligent optical switch. The company claims it is the first to announce the availability of both GMPLS and UNI 1.0 on its intelligent optical switches.

On a port-by-port basis, the SN 16000 intelligent optical switch now has the ability to support concurrently GMPLS, UNI 1.0, and traditional provisioning processes and protection mechanisms--including BLSR/MS-SPRing, UPSR/SNCP, and dynamic mesh protection schemes. This flexibility enables service providers to utilize any combination of these standards, protocols, and protection schemes to simplify operational procedures and seamlessly introduce dynamic new services based on GMPLS and UNI without disrupting existing services or management operations, say company representatives.

"The availability of GMPLS and UNI, in conjunction with our support for other standards and protocols, represents another step in our ongoing initiative to simplify the network migration process with the inter-working of ring, mesh, and hybrid network topologies," explains Kevin Oye, vice president of systems and technology at Sycamore Networks. "Service providers recognize the cost and operational benefits provided by optically switched networks, and Sycamore is making it even easier to derive those benefits without disrupting the existing network, services, or revenue streams," he adds.

As part of its ongoing commitment to the development of a standardized optical control plane, Sycamore has recently demonstrated multi-vendor interoperability with several leading equipment vendors. In March of 2003, Sycamore demonstrated multi-vendor interoperability with a range of third-party client devices, optical networking products, and networking protocol software from eleven different vendors using OIF's integrated UNI and NNI solution at the Optical Fiber Communications (OFC) 2003 conference. At the Next Generation Networks (NGN) 2002 conference, Sycamore's optical switches formed the optical core for the world's first public GMPLS demonstration.

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