RAD offers Ethernet demarcation in SFP form factor

RAD Data Communications says it will unveil a fully functional Ethernet network interface device (NID) in an SFP form factor Ethernet Network Interface Device (NID) at Ethernet Expo Americas in early November. The Micro Network Interface Device (MiNID) plugs into the SFP cage of any manufacturer’s platform, giving it Carrier Ethernet demarcation and service-level agreement (SLA) verification capabilities.

Oct 26th, 2012

RAD Data Communications says it will unveil a fully functional Ethernet network interface device (NID) in an SFP form factor at Ethernet Expo Americas in early November. The Micro Network Interface Device (MiNID) plugs into the SFP cage of any manufacturer’s platform, giving it Carrier Ethernet demarcation and service-level agreement (SLA) verification capabilities.

RAD says the new device will more easily enable service providers, wholesale carriers, and mobile operators to receive real-time network and performance reports with per-Class of Service SLA definition.

The MiNID can handle up to 1 Gbps of Ethernet traffic and features per-port and per-flow monitoring capabilities, including Ethernet OAM and loopbacks. It can be remotely managed independently from its hosting device or, alternatively, it can be integrated with its hosting device to enable them to act together and appear as a single platform.

“The ability to seamlessly integrate RAD’s MiNID SFP into a hosting device offers huge savings for carriers and operators who would otherwise have to rely on multi-box deployments,” notes Yacov Cazes, RAD director of business development. “This new product is suitable for base stations, especially small cells where size and power are issues, as well as switches or routers that are not equipped for Carrier Ethernet in order to furnish them with Carrier Ethernet capabilities. The MiNID can also be inserted into a wholesale provider device to add end-to-end service monitoring and control.”

“Today, service providers and enterprises demand strict adherence to performance guarantees for Ethernet services,” said Ron Kline, principal analyst for network infrastructure at Ovum. “Plug-and-play performance monitoring and service management capabilities without ripping and replacing equipment will certainly get network operators’ attention.”

“We anticipate a high degree of interest among service providers in a solution such as the MiNID,” agreed Michael Howard, principal analyst and co-founder of Infonetics Research. “There is a strong business case to be made for this approach, particularly in applications such as small cells, virtual private networks, and the combination of service provider and wholesale provider network termination units.”

For more information on Carrier Ethernet products and suppliers, visit the Lightwave Buyer’s Guide.

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