Crosslake Fiber plans to connect NJ and NY with fiber-optic submarine cable

Canadian dark fiber supplier Crosslake Fibre has announced its plans to build a fiber-optic submarine cable directly connecting Wall, NJ, to Long Island, NY. With a 95-km high fiber count, the company expects the unrepeatered submarine cable system will deliver a physically diverse, lower latency route between cable landing stations in Long Island and New Jersey. The cable system's endpoints will be located at the New Jersey Fiber Exchange (NJFX) in Wall, and 1025Connect in Westbury, Long Island.

Canadian dark fiber supplier Crosslake Fibre has announced its plans to build a fiber-optic submarine cable directly connecting Wall, NJ, to Long Island, NY. With a 95-km high fiber count, the company expects the unrepeatered submarine cable system will deliver a physically diverse, lower latency route between cable landing stations in Long Island and New Jersey. The cable system's endpoints will be located at the New Jersey Fiber Exchange (NJFX) in Wall, and 1025Connect in Westbury, Long Island.

"The need for a Manhattan bypass route is growing more critical with increased network congestion and weather-related threats in the region," said Mike Cunningham, Crosslake Fibre's chief executive officer. "We selected these endpoints as they are increasingly important hubs for transoceanic connectivity and provide a variety of network connectivity options for customers. As additional transoceanic cables carrying much of the world's Internet traffic land in the region, and growth on existing cables continues, new domestic connectivity onward from the cable landing stations is important."

Crosslake's plans for the Wall to Long Island cable system follow a May announcement regarding its first infrastructure project, a submarine cable system linking Toronto and Buffalo, NY, across Lake Ontario (see "Crosslake Fibre plans submarine cable across Lake Ontario").

Crosslake says it will own and operate the Wall to Long Island cable system, and be responsible for management, which will enable the company to provide services for its commercial customers. It will also offer dark fiber and managed services to enterprise and carrier customers. The undersea fiber-optic network should be ready for service by June 2019, according to Crosslake.

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