Transition Networks offers N-GXE-SFP-02 PCIe dual-speed Ethernet fiber-to-the-desktop network interface card

Transition Networks, Inc. has unveiled the N-GXE-SFP-02, a PCIe dual-speed fiber network interface card (NIC) for government and enterprise fiber-to-the-desktop (FTTD) applications. The NIC supports 100/1000-Mbps Ethernet transmission via an open small form-factor pluggable (SFP) design and is available to order now.

Transition Networks, Inc. has unveiled the N-GXE-SFP-02, a PCIe dual-speed fiber network interface card (NIC) for government and enterprise fiber-to-the-desktop (FTTD) applications. The NIC supports 100/1000-Mbps Ethernet transmission via an open small form-factor pluggable (SFP) design and is available to order now.

The N-GXE-SFP-02 complies with IEEE 802.3u and 802.3z. It auto-negotiates between 100- and 1000-Mbps Ethernet speeds based on the inserted SFP. This ability streamlines the transition of networks from Fast Ethernet to Gigabit Ethernet by obviating the need to change NICs. The card accommodates both single-mode fiber and multimode fiber SFPs, which adds flexibility and reduces inventory requirements. It also provides full-duplex bandwidth capacity to support high-end servers.

The NIC also supports Wake-on-LAN (WoL). This feature enables network administrators to awaken a PC via a network message, which enables off-hours maintenance at a remote site without a truck roll. The NIC also features such advanced functions as VLAN filtering, link aggregation, smart load balancing, failover, and support for PXE and UEFI Boot, among others.

"FTTD applications keep growing as networks get faster, bandwidth requirements continue to increase due to advanced applications, and security concerns remain high. This new NIC gives customers an easy way to take advantage of the bandwidth and security benefits of fiber connections as they increase network speeds," said GlenNiece Kutsch, product manager at Transition Networks. "For many organizations this will be the only NIC required for all of their FTTD connections thanks to the flexibility of the open SFP design."

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