OIF tackles 400G Framework Document

The Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF) will look to repeat its successful 100-Gbps specification work at 400 Gbps. Members of the organization launched an effort toward a 400G Framework Document at its most recent meeting in late October.

The Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF) will look to repeat its successful 100-Gbps specification work at 400 Gbps. Members of the organization launched an effort toward a 400G Framework Document at its most recent meeting in late October.

The group also agreed to expand its 100G work through the definition of integrated polarization-multiplexed quadrature-modulated transmitters for 100G metro applications and update the multi-link gear box protocol at the meeting, which was hosted by Huawei.

The 400G work will see collaboration between the OIF’s Physical and Link Layer (PLL) and Carrier Working Groups. Along the lines of the 100G Framework Document (see “OIF issues 100G framework document”), this new project will see OIF members analyze and discuss tradeoffs among high-order modulation formats, high data rates per channel, and a number of subcarriers, which they expect will lead to the definition of application scenarios and limits for 400G operation. The framework document effort also will cover single optical carrier versus multi-carrier approaches for long-haul and metro applications.

“Recently, several approaches to achieving 400G data transmission have been proposed with reported transmit fiber distances from short-haul to long-haul applications,” said Nathan Tracy, TE Connectivity and the OIF’s Technical Committee chair. “To develop this white paper, the OIF intends to bring the industry together to discuss the options and where the gaps exist for initial 400G long-haul implementations.”

Meanwhile, at 100 Gbps, the OIF has recognized the need for 100G coherent optical modulator modules for lower-cost, higher-density coherent metro applications. The new “Integrated Polarization Multiplexed Quadrature Modulated Transmitters for Metro Applications” project will seek to incorporate the use of new and advanced modulator technologies to enable smaller and more cost-effective components for metro coherent 100G.

The Multi-Link Gearbox (MLG) 3.0 project will define a protocol to support in-band and remote monitoring and control as well as define IEEE 802.3bj RS-FEC compatibility. In some applications the transport of 10GBase-R signals over Nx20G links requires definition, including 2x20G and 1x40G links, the OIF feels. The MLG 3.0 project will seek to define in-band coding that preserves 10GBase-R physical lane-to-lane ordering and in-lane bit ordering to support synchronous and asynchronous 10G lanes.

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