Analog Devices unveils first 11-Gbps and 6-Gbps integrated optical receivers

Analog Devices Inc. (ADI), a provider of high-performance semiconductors for high-performance signal processing applications, introduced the industry’s first commercially available 11-Gbps and 6-Gbps integrated optical receivers at the Optical Fiber Communications Conference and Exposition (OFC) in Los Angeles, Calif.

Analog Devices Inc. (ADI), a provider of high-performance semiconductors for high-performance signal processing applications, introduced the industry’s first commercially available 11-Gbps and 6-Gbps integrated optical receivers at the Optical Fiber Communications Conference and Exposition (OFC) in Los Angeles, Calif.

Analog Devices’ ADN3000-06 and ADN3000-11 integrated optical receivers, manufactured on ADI’s proprietary XFCB high-speed complementary bipolar process on bonded SOI, reduce system component count to one device and reduce the power consumption by at least half as compared to current offerings, according to a spokesperson.

The monolithic approach eliminates photodiode to TIA wire bonds, enabling a fully characterized system that reduces design complexity and improves design reliability in fiber-optic networks. The new optical receivers are compatible with normal incidence, standard telecom, and datacom ROSAs (receive optical subassemblies) used today. The technology is extensible to multi-channel devices and will allow high-performance optical communications links to migrate to higher-volume applications, such as active optical cable and high-performance computing.

The ADN3000-06 and ADN3000-11 optical receivers consume 65 mW while running on a single 3.3-V power supply offering typical sensitivity of -19 dBm OMA (optical modulation amplitude) at 6 Gbps and -17dBm OMA at 11 Gbps.

ADN3000-06/11 optical receiver key features and benefits include:

  • Wavelength agnostic: works across key optical wavelengths, including 850 nm, 1310nm, and 1550 nm
  • Fully characterized interface between the photo detector and the transimpedance amplifier: guarantees stability without worrying about bond wires
  • Single, fully-tested die solution reduces cost: no additional components needed inside the ROSA, and no separate tests required for the TIA and PD
  • 65-mW power consumption: reduces power by more than 50 percent, when compared to current designs
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