Oclaro sampling new high-power 980-nm pump lasers with smaller footprint, higher output power

Oclaro, Inc. (NASDAQ: OCLR) says it has begun sampling a pair of new high-power pump lasers. The first is a 500-mW uncooled 980-nm pump laser; the second is a 2x600-mW dual-chip pump in a single package.

Oclaro, Inc. (NASDAQ: OCLR) says it has begun sampling a pair of new high-power pump lasers. The first is a 500-mW uncooled 980-nm pump laser; the second is a 2x600-mW dual-chip pump in a single package.

The 500-mW uncooled pump offers a small form factor -- an SFF 10-pin butterfly package -- that can also be used in existing 14-pin slots. With 500-mW of “kink-free power,” the pump laser delivers the lower power consumption than competing devices, Oclaro asserts. The pump operates across the -5 to 75degC temperature range, is wavelength stabilized, qualified to Telcordia GR-468-CORE, and RoHS 6/6 compliant, the company adds.

The new pump features the Oclaro OC2 alignment and package platform. Oclaro positions the new pump as an alternative to traditional cooled pumps for powers up to 500 mW for use in metro, cross-connect, and single- or multi-channel applications. The pump is designed to address the demand for SFF single-channel and 40-Gbps per-channel amplifiers with higher power requirements, Oclaro adds.

Meanwhile, the new dual pump is designed for dual-stage and mid-stage access amplifiers, ROADM on blade, and amplifier-based line cards. The dual pump comes in a 1x14-pin package that replaces two discrete pumps. The pump features two independent co-packaged lasers that are individually addressable and stabilized. The device delivers negligible cross-talk and offers the full functionality of traditional 14-pin pumps, Oclaro asserts.

The dual-stage pump also lowers the total module power consumption versus two discrete pumps and enables customers to reduce cost through simplified control electronics and reduced component count, the company adds.

The pump also leverages the Oclaro OC2 alignment and packaging technology. In addition, the new pump enables the pumping of multi-stage amplifiers with lower component count, reduced power consumption, smaller form factor, and a lower cost total design through the use of a single TEC, Oclaro concludes.

Both pumps are sampling to customers and will be available in volume production later this year.

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