Ranovus unveils optical engine, 200-Gbps PAM4 optical transceiver

Ranovus Inc. says it has successfully commercialized its multi-wavelength quantum dot laser (QDL) and silicon photonics ring resonator modulator technologies. The company is now sampling optical engines and PAM4 200-Gbps CFP2 optical transceivers based on these building blocks, with general availability slated for this December.

Ranovus Inc. says it has successfully commercialized its multi-wavelength quantum dot laser (QDL) and silicon photonics ring resonator modulator technologies. The company is now sampling optical engines and PAM4 200-Gbps CFP2 optical transceivers based on these building blocks, with general availability slated for this December.

The company formed in 2012 and emerged from stealth mode in 2013, founded by principles from CoreOptics, the coherent technology firm Cisco acquired in 2010 (see "RANOVUS hopes to ride quantum dot lasers to data center success"). Ranovus has targeted direct-detect multi-wavelength data center network applications (including data center interconnect) that take advantage of the QDL's multiwavelength capabilities. The Ranovus QDL can support 96 wavelengths; at 50 Gbps for each wavelength, a QDL-enabled Ranovus transceiver can support 4.6 Tbps, said Saeid Aramideh, co-founder and chief marketing and sales officer. Paired with the right electronics, the Ranovus products can support reaches up to 120 km, he added.

The use of the QDL and ring resonator structure enable a low-power design that supports WDM signal modulation without the need for multiplexing or de-multiplexing architectures, Ranovus asserts.

The company collaborated with ADVA Optical Networking in the development of these initial products. The partnership was helpful in ensuring that the optical engine and transceiver would meet data center interconnect (DCI) requirements, Aramideh explained.

"Data center operators have been looking for a long time for a disruptive solution to achieve scalable multi-terabits bandwidth connectivity in a form factor that consumes less power and is much less expensive than other available products," said Christoph Glingener, CTO/COO at ADVA Optical Networking, via a Ranovus press release. "That's why our relationship with the team at Ranovus is so important. Together, we're developing direct-detect DCI technology that will have a significant impact on the market."

In addition to manufacturers of data center interconnect platforms, Aramideh said the company hopes to supply transceiver vendors with the optical engine. He also said that webscale data center operators interested in building their own systems provide an attractive target. Ranovus has delivered samples to multiple potential customers, according to Aramideh.

The company will demonstrate the new products at ECOC in Dusseldorf next week. Aramideh adds that 400-Gbps products aimed at the CFP8 form factor are upcoming, while onboard optics applications remain a subject of interest.

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