Spectroscopy platform integrates light source, optical comb generator, optical frequency meter

November 9, 2005 Tokyo, Japan -- Optical Comb Institute, Inc. has introduced its MF-0581A Optical Frequency Counter, a testing unit that integrates functions including a frequency-stabilized light source, optical comb generator, and optical frequency meter.

Th 192398

November 9, 2005 Tokyo, Japan -- Optical Comb Institute, Inc. has introduced its MF-0581A Optical Frequency Counter, a testing unit that integrates functions including a frequency-stabilized light source, optical comb generator, and optical frequency meter.

According to the company, to use the device, a user need only connect the input light source to be measured (in C-band or 1530 � 1565 nm) to the device and press the "Start" button; the unit then displays the optical frequency in the order of 1 MHz (9 digits), which is 100x more precise than the conventional methods, says the company.

The company says the technology used in the product was awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics, and that the product has made the "laser- based precision spectroscopy, including the optical frequency comb technique" available to the market in the form of an all-in-one unit.

The company says the product has great potential to bring about a breakthrough not only in the development of optical communication devices and equipment, but also in optical measurement applications for non-communication purposes.

According to the company, a wavelength meter, which measures the frequency of light utilizing interference with the reference light source, has traditionally been used for measuring optical wavelength and frequency. However, the company says this method allows a maximum precision of only up to 7 digits (100 MHz), which effectively caps the significant digits of displayed results.

Conversely, the company says its Optical Frequency Counter measures the absolute value of the optical frequency using a comb-like multiple frequency light source (optical comb) that works as a reference or a "scale" for the measurement. This method allows a 9-digit precision (1 MHz) 100x higher than that of conventional technologies.Th 192398

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