Anritsu offers O/E modules for VectorStar VNAs for 56-Gbps testing

Test and measurement specialist Anritsu Co. has enhanced its MN4765B series of O/E modules for the MS4640B VectorStar Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) line to support measurement of 56-Gbps components and transceivers. The module and VNA now provides an economical alternative to conventional total-system approaches in R&D and manufacturing environments, Anritsu asserts.

Test and measurement specialist Anritsu Co. has enhanced its MN4765B series of O/E modules for the MS4640B VectorStar Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) line to support measurement of 56-Gbps components and transceivers. The module and VNA now provides an economical alternative to conventional total-system approaches in R&D and manufacturing environments, Anritsu asserts.

The MN4765B optical modules leverage an InGaAs photodiode to convert modulated optical signals to electrical signals. The photodiode displays what Anritsu asserts is exceptional bandwidth response to 70 GHz and 110 GHz. The modules also feature circuitry for temperature and bias stability.

The VNA acquires magnitude and phase characterization using a primary standard characterized by NIST and conducted in the Anritsu calibration lab. The result is improved measurement uncertainty when the MN4765B is used with VectorStar across the VNA's frequency range, Anritsu says.

Taken together, the MN4765B module and the MS4640B enable accurate, traceable corrected transfer function, group delay, and return loss measurements of E/O and O/E components and subsystems, Anritsu says.

The company adds it also plans to offer an option for the MN4765B that will enable the module to be used with the ME7838x series Broadband VectorStar VNA for accurate optoelectronic measurements over what Anritsu asserts is an industry-leading 70 kHz to 110 GHz in the 1550-nm range. The company believes this capability will make the instrument useful to universities and research labs. Use of a NIST-characterized photodiode as the primary standard offers a better alternative to current methods that rely on a non-characterized diode, Anritsu adds. The more common approach can result in uncertainties of 3-5 dB, the company concludes.

For more information on test instruments and suppliers, visit the Lightwave Buyer's Guide.




More in Design & Manufacturing